Film Directing

$325.00

8 weeks. Date TBD

Interested in this course? Send us a message to info@iafalive.com and we will include you on the pre-registration list.

Film Directing

$325.00

8 weeks. Date TBD

Interested in this course? Send us a message to info@iafalive.com and we will include you on the pre-registration list.

Film Directing

$325.00

8 weeks. Date TBD

Interested in this course? Send us a message to info@iafalive.com and we will include you on the pre-registration list.

Learn basic tools for directing films and receive professional guidance to apply to your own project.

Through analysis of films and practical assignments, learn key elements of film language and directing. If you’re currently developing a short film, you will have the opportunity to be advised by a professional filmmaker.

Study different Directing styles, camera techniques, types of shots, directing actors, and how to apply them to your own work.

Each week, students participate in a 1-hour LIVE class and interact directly with the instructor and other classmates. You will have access to class recordings and supporting materials at any time allowing you to study at your own convenience. After each lecture, you will work on theoretical and practical exercises and receive feedback from the instructor.

At the end of the course, you will have developed your narrative directing skills and have the opportunity to workshop some core elements of your own project.

Instructor

Fabio Montanari

Fabio Montanari is a screenwriter and director with experience working in Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela and the United States. He has written scripts for Netflix, HBO, and GloboTV, and produced content for Sony, AXN and MTV Brazil. His short films have screened at multiple festivals including Palm Springs Shortsfest and theSanta Barbara International Film Festival. Fabio holds an MFA in Film from Columbia University in New York (Fulbright scholar).

Instructor

Fabio Montanari

Fabio Montanari is a screenwriter and director with experience working in Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela and the United States. He has written scripts for Netflix, HBO, and GloboTV, and produced content for Sony, AXN and MTV Brazil. His short films have screened at multiple festivals including Palm Springs Shortsfest and theSanta Barbara International Film Festival. Fabio holds an MFA in Film from Columbia University in New York (Fulbright scholar).

Instructor

Fabio Montanari

Fabio Montanari is a screenwriter and director with experience working in Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela and the United States. He has written scripts for Netflix, HBO, and GloboTV, and produced content for Sony, AXN and MTV Brazil. His short films have screened at multiple festivals including Palm Springs Shortsfest and theSanta Barbara International Film Festival. Fabio holds an MFA in Film from Columbia University in New York (Fulbright scholar).

Syllabus

  • Week 1

    The Fundamentals of Classic Directing

    • The core dramatic elements of Classic Film Directing
    • How to Direct the central beats of a story
    • Shot progression: how to use camera to articulate beats and dramatic arcs
    • Scene analysis: through case studies of classic films and modern high-quality TV series
  • Week 2

    The Narrative Dramatic Tools

    • The Director’s approach to Narrative Storytelling
    • Director’s Toolkit: composition, screen direction, camera and actor staging
    • Narrating versus illustrating
    • Scene analysis: Peter Bogdanovich’s Paper Moon and Vince Gilligan’s Breaking Bad
  • Week 3

    Rhythm of Revelation

    • Storytelling through dramatic revelation
    • The use of Off-screen space
    • Film Time: Elaboration and Compression
    • Preparing To Film: Creating a Shot List and a Lined Script
  • Week 4

    Camera work and styles

    • Objective Camera
    • Expository images: the issue of “covering a scene.”
    • Subjective Camera: camera as character
    • The Director’s vision as camera expression: an analysis of Scorsese’s Taxi Driver.
  • Week 5

    The Dramatic Effects of Long Takes and Blocking

    • The dramatic power and function of a long take
    • Theoretical application of long take – Theories of Film critic André Bazin
    • Staging Techniques: how to articulate drama through blocking
    • Long Shot Case Studies: Alfonso Cuaron’s Roma, Ari Aster’s Midsommar and Woody Allen’s Crimes and Misdemeanors
  • Week 6

    Beyond the Image: Storytelling and Sound

    • “The Lubitsch Touch”: suggestive shots and camera as metaphor
    • Sound as narrative tool
    • Case Study: Fernando Meirelles’ Blindness and Cohen Brothers’ Fargo
    • Sound as efficient and subjective storytelling
    • Sound as Point of View: Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation case study
  • Week 7

    Directing Actors

    • Approaches to Acting: Howard Hawks Scarface and Elia Kazan’s On the Waterfront
    • Directing actors’ techniques: action verbs and scene analysis
    • Camera beats vs. Acting beats
    • Actor blocking and action vs. activity
  • Week 8

    Role of Director in the Editing Room

    • The Core Elements of editing: a conversation between Walter Murch’s In the Blink of an Eye and Ralph Rosenblum’s When The Shooting Stops… The Cutting Begins.
    • The collaboration between Director and Editor: analysis of successful case studies.
    • Comparing traditional and non-traditional editing styles
    • Final considerations and practices for your short film

How our classes work

IAFA’s online courses are handled inside Blackboard, one of the most advanced LMS platforms for online education. Blackboard integrates its platform with a tool called Collaborate. Collaborate is a virtual classroom where students and instructor can interact using a camera and a microphone.

You will watch the instructor speak live, and will be able to ask questions and interact using your own video and audio feed. Within Collaborate you can also have dedicated group activities, which means that the instructor can divide the class in smaller groups to assign discussions, much like in an actual classroom.

All live classes are recorded, so students that cannot access the live class on the scheduled date and time can watch it later at their convenience.

Inside Blackboard you will find all the contents of your course. Your class script (a powerpoint used for the live class), your exclusive workbook, exercises, assignments and supporting materials. All of this is organized to expand the learning experience of the live class.

IAFA believes in a practical approach to learning. So your assignments will be practical exercises that will be evaluated by the instructor. You will receive written or video feedback on your work.

The online experience mirrors that of a physical classroom, often expanding it through the use of technology.

Technology requirements

MAC

Computer Operating System: Windows 10

Desktop Browser: Google Chrome (latest update)

Computer Speed and Processor: At least 8GB. (*if you are using a video software such as Adobe Premiere Pro, a dedicated video card may be required depending on your computer configuration.)

Download and Upload Speed: at least 10MB for upload, and at least 5MB for download.

PC

Computer Operating System: Windows 10

Desktop Browser: Google Chrome (latest update)

Computer Speed and Processor: At least 8GB. (*if you are using a video software such as Adobe Premiere Pro, a dedicated video card may be required depending on your computer configuration.)

Download and Upload Speed: at least 10MB for upload, and at least 5MB for download.

This will cover much of the standard household computers, tablets and smartphones.

Additional Information

If you miss the real-time, LIVE class, you can access the recorded version of the class, as well as supporting materials, any time during the course.

Class size limited to 24 students.

Instructor’s location: São Paulo, Brazil

Language: English.

Certificate issued by IAFA upon completion of the course.

FAQ